What about the Community of Caring?

I confess, I have not been able to report on the Morris Plains mayoral race in which long-time incumbent Frank Druetzler is being challenged by Mike Butchko.
 
Anyone out there know — will this be close?

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Last minute appeal from Doug Herbert

The Democrat running against Rodney Frelinghuysen, Doug Herbert, wrote up and sent over a last minute op-ed. We can’t run it all, but here is some of what he said,

“We must ask ourselves, is the status-quo acceptable? If not, has Rodney Frelinghuysen shown independent leadership during this time of economic uncertainty?

 Mr. Frelinghuysen has found himself in an unfortunate niche in Congress of late, the niche of a career politician. Having been in Congress for 16 years, he has increasingly given in to his party at the expense of our District.

The Eleventh District deserves a Congressman with strong economic and fiscal policies. As a small business owner, I understand that small businesses are the engine of our economic growth. That is why I have proposed a three-point plan to jumpstart small businesses. I will fight to provide payroll tax credits to small businesses that hire Americans who are out of work. I will fight to expand guaranteed loan programs and credit lines that will provide small businesses with the resources to grow. Lastly, I will fight for investments and tax credits for competitive research grants that will help the Eleventh District innovate. As a result, our district can expect new, high paying, and secure jobs.

While focusing on the current jobs crisis, I will not ignore the long-term threat of crippling debt. If we continue to pass deficit budgets, an unsustainable future will be the legacy we pass on to our children, and that is unacceptable. The Eleventh District deserves a Congressman who understands that.

 After 16 years, Rodney Frelinghuysen has forgotten his obligation to our District. After 16 years, I ask you to give me a chance. I will fight to create jobs and to help our small businesses, and I will never jeopardize the competitiveness of our nation.”  

Douglas Herbert

Christie hitting the road again …

The governor has a rather frenzied campaign swing on tap for the next two days.

Friday morning, he will attend two rallies in Pennsylvania for gubernatorial candidate Tom Corbett, who is ahead in the polls.  Then, it’s off to Ohio for an afternoon appearance with gubernatorial candidate John Kasich, whose race is getting tighter according to the polls.

Then, it’s back on the private jet for a trip to Michigan to campaign for gubernatorial candidate Rick Snyder, who has a comfortable lead.

After a late night flight west, Saturday morning will find Christie in Oregon to campaign for gubernatorial candidate Chris Dudley, who is in a neck and neck race. Some may recall Dudley as a former player for the New York Knicks. (He was a horrible foul shooter)

Then, the gov. heads east to help Minnesota gubernatorial candidate Tom Emmer. He can use the help. Emmer is trailing badly.

The Parsippany Wall?

 There was a forum in Dover last night with the three Democrats running for freeholder.  (Republicans had a meeting and did not show; other than write-in candidate Jim Murray)

Candidate  Eliot Isibor in his introductory remarks threw in a line about Ann Grossi, one of his Republican opponents, wanting to build a wall in Parsippany. A wall?

A member of the audience asked him about that and he explained that Grossi had been quoted in a weekly newspaper article of talking about “building a wall” around Parsippany.

Now, you know that was either a facetious comment or something taken out of context … No one is going to build a wall around a town?

It just goes to show that attending a candidates’ forum can be fun. Then again, what would be the purpose of the Parsippany Wall — keeping people out or keeping people in?

Rodney on the tunnel — all over the tracks

 The congressman’s statement is below: Take a guess if he thinks Christie did right or wrong

“I have always supported mass transportation for our area to include another trans-Hudson tunnel.  However, I have also said that a tunnel with an initial estimate of $5.3 billion looks significantly different when it now carries a $14 billion cost to our taxpayers! 

“I have said publicly and privately that Governor Christie has the right and responsibility to question more recent cost estimates because ultimately New Jersey taxpayers would have to pay more.

“Furthermore, as I have also said publicly, the existing plan is flawed, as it is connected to no other transportation networks in New York City, is solely dedicated to New Jersey Transit, which it should not be, and has not taken fully into account where commuters will park on the Jersey side!”

Tunnel aftermath

The governor is being hailed and condemned by the usual suspects in the aftermath of his decision to kill the Hudson River Tunnel _ once again.

On balance, the decision will probably win a popularity contest today, but many New Jersey residents will regret it down the road. I understand the governor’s thinking, but this really is a short-sighted decision. Public transportation projects are expensive, but you have to compare the cost to the extended benefit. And in this case, that extended benefit is providing a congested state with a viable transportation system.

No tunnel is a mistake

It looks like the governor may kill the Hudson River Tunnel a second time — this time for good

All I can say is that this is good politics at the moment, but bad long-term for the state. I am surprised at what seems to be a short-sighted view.